The UNC Charlotte National Writing Project Site

Welcome! We are happy you've found your way to this space. On this website, you'll find information about our upcoming conferences, resources for current TCs, and writing created by NWP-affiliated teachers. We welcome your feedback; please feel free to let us know what other site resources you would find useful.

-UNC Charlotte WP Leadership Team

 

Untangling Urban Middle School Reform

News

Dr. Cindy Urbanski, UNC Charlotte WP teacher-consultant and associate director, has published Untangling Middle School Reform: Clashing Agendas for Literacy Standards and Student Success. Be sure to check it out!

 

Young Writer's Camp 

The University of North Carolina at Charlotte is pleased to host Writing Project Young Writer's Camp, July 10-14 and 17-21, 2017 at the UNC Charlotte main campus from 9:00 to 4:00 pm daily.

Rising 5th through 8th grade:

Children attending this camp will have the opportunity to grow as writers.  Our theme for the week will be “Social Justice.” The goal of the camp is to inspire participants to develop fresh ideas in order to take on the social issues that they see in the world today. We will explore how young people can use their voices to make a difference; participants will use their writing skills the same way historians, journalists, philosophers, and lawyers do when defending the rights of people in our society who are without a voice.  

We look forward to sharing children’s writing of fiction, poetry and nonfiction pieces.  Students will also have the opportunity to work with digital composition through documentary making.  Camp writers will read age appropriate mentor texts and receive instruction on several elements of writing content, including clarifying a writing voice, evidence and argument, characterization, and writing style.  

We will host an open mic for students to read excerpts from their work from the week on both Fridays of the camp at 3pm.  Families are invited to celebrate this writing with us.  The writing will also be published in an anthology.  Each family will receive one copy in the Fall and other copies will be available online for purchase.

 

Rising 2nd-4th Grade

Children attending this camp will have the opportunity to grow as writers. Our theme for the week will be "What's your why?"  Why are you encouraged or challenged to be kind?  What is your role as a citizen? How can you make a difference in yourself, your family, your community, your city, your state, your country, and your world?  Participants will use show off their writing skills the same way historians, journalists, philosophers, and lawyers are asked to do when making their voices heard.

We look forward to sharing children’s writing of fiction, poetry and nonfiction pieces. Students will also have the opportunity to work with digital composition through documentary making. Camp writers will read age- appropriate mentor texts and receive instruction on several elements of writing content, including clarifying a writing voice, evidence and argument, characterization, and writing style.  

We will host an open mic for students to read excerpts from their work from the week on both Fridays of the camp at 3pm.  Families are invited to celebrate this writing with us.  The writing will also be published in an anthology.  Each family will receive one copy in the fall and other copies will be available online for purchase.

For more information and registration: please visit this link

 

 

 

NWP Philosophy

Our site is a member of the network of National Writing Project sites. The core principals of NWP are:

  • Teachers at every level—from kindergarten through college—are the agents of reform; universities and schools are ideal partners for investing in that reform through professional development.
  • Writing can and should be taught, not just assigned, at every grade level. Professional development programs should provide opportunities for teachers to work together to understand the full spectrum of writing development across grades and across subject areas.
  • Knowledge about the teaching of writing comes from many sources: theory and research, the analysis of practice, and the experience of writing. Effective professional development programs provide frequent and ongoing opportunities for teachers to write and to examine theory, research, and practice together systematically.
  • There is no single right approach to teaching writing; however, some practices prove to be more effective than others. A reflective and informed community of practice is in the best position to design and develop comprehensive writing programs.
  • Teachers who are well informed and effective in their practice can be successful teachers of other teachers as well as partners in educational research, development, and implementation. Collectively, teacher-leaders are our greatest resource for educational reform.